Pork Shoulder Vs Pork Butt

Pork Shoulder Vs Pork Butt

When it comes to pork, there are a few different cuts that you might come across. In this blog post, we’re going to take a closer look at the two most popular cuts: the pork shoulder and the pork butt. We’ll discuss the difference between the two cuts, and help you decide which is right for your next dinner party. Let’s get started!

Pork Shoulder Vs Pork Butt

What is pork butt?

Pork butt is a cut of pork that comes from the shoulder of the pig. It is sometimes called Boston butt, as this is where it was historically sold in Boston. Pork butt is a tough cut of meat, but it is flavorful and affordable. It can be cooked using a variety of methods, including roasting, grilling, or smoking.

Pork butt is often used to make pulled pork. Pulled pork is a dish made by cooking pork butt slowly until it is fork-tender. The meat is then shredded or pulled apart and served with barbecue sauce or other sauces. Pulled pork can be eaten as a sandwich, on a plate, or in a tort wrap.

If you are looking for a flavorful and affordable cut of pork, pork butt is a great option. It can be cooked using a variety of methods, and it is perfect for making pulled pork. Be sure to check out your local grocery store or butcher shop to find pork butt. You won’t be disappointed!

What is pork shoulder?

The shoulder of the pig is that part that lies between the end of its rib cage and where it becomes a leg. The ” Boston butt”  portion,  or shoulder blade bone, is often used in preparing pork for barbecue.

Pork shoulder can be easily cut with a knife to make chops or steaks. It is marbled with fat and has a coarse grain. Because it contains so much connective tissue, pork shoulder requires long cooking times at low temperatures with moist heat to tenderize it sufficiently for eating. Slow-cooked pulled pork shoulder, also called BBQ pulled pork, slow-cooked ribs, barbecued ribs, hickory-smoked pulled pork, hickory-smoked beef brisket is some examples of dishes made with this cut of meat.

When cooked properly, pork shoulder is a very flavorful and tender cut of meat. It can be served as is or used in various recipes. Pork shoulder is a cheaper alternative to other cuts of pork, making it a popular choice for those on a budget. With the right cooking method, pork shoulder can be an affordable and delicious addition to any meal.

Pork Butt vs Pork Shoulder Comparison: What’s the Difference?

Many a pork lover gets confused when asking for a pork butt or a pork shoulder at the grocery store. Pork butt is a cut of meat from the upper part of the pig’s shoulder, and it has a lot of marbling, or fat, running through it. This makes the pork butt very tender and juicy, with a strong flavor. Pork shoulder is a less expensive cut of meat that comes from the lower part of the pig’s shoulder. Pork shoulder is less fatty, which produces a tougher cut of meat that sometimes requires more cooking time. There are some differences between the two cuts of meat:

Flavor: 

The pork butt has a lot of marbling in the muscle fibers, which results in a very tender cut of meat that is packed with flavor. Because of its high-fat content, the pork butt does not require additional oil for cooking and will stay moist during the cooking process because of the amount of fat in it. Pork shoulder has a more mild flavor because it has less marbling than pork butt. Pork shoulder tends to be drier and requires more time to cook in order to break down the muscle fibers and make them tender.

Texture: 

Pork butt has a very juicy, tender, and fatty texture. The high-fat content makes it moist and gives it a strong flavor. Pork shoulder is not as juicy or tender as pork butt, but it is still a flavorful cut of meat. The texture of pork shoulder is more firm because it does not have as much marbling as a pork butt. It can be difficult to chew if the pork shoulder is not cooked properly.

Cost: 

Pork butt is more expensive than pork shoulder because of its high demand and quality. The amount of marbling in the meat causes the pork butt to be juicier and more flavorful, which makes it a popular choice for many people. Pork shoulder is less expensive than pork butt and can usually be found at a lower price.

Availability: 

Pork butt and pork shoulder are both readily available through the butcher and some grocery stores and some supermarkets.

Cooking methods: 

Pork butt and the pork shoulder can be cooked using a number of different methods. Some of the most common cooking techniques include roasting, braising, smoking, barbecuing, or grilling. The meat will become tender and juicy if cooked properly with any method.

Composition: 

Pork butt is also referred to as Boston Butt and it is an anatomical term referring to the upper part of the pig’s shoulder. Pork shoulder is a cut of meat that comes from the lower part of the pig’s shoulder.

The shape of the cut: 

The pork butt is a larger cut of meat, and it has a round shape. The pork shoulder is a smaller cut of meat, and it has a triangular shape.

Storage period: 

Pork shoulder can be stored in the fridge for 3-4 days, while pork butt can be stored in the fridge for 5-7 days. If you’re freezing pork shoulder, it will last for 2-6 months, while pork butt will last for 3-6 months.

Cooking temperature: 

When it comes to cooking, pork shoulder is best cooked at a low temperature for a longer period of time, while pork butt is best cooked at a high temperature for a shorter amount of time. This is because the fat and collagen in the pork butt make it more forgiving if it’s overcooked, whereas the pork shoulder can become dry if cooked for too long.

Safety:

There is a difference between pork butt and pork shoulder when it comes to safety. Pork butt has less fat than pork shoulder, making it a safer option for those looking to avoid eating too much fat. Pork shoulder is higher in fat, which can increase the risk of food-borne illness. For this reason, pork butt is generally considered the safer option.

When preparing either cut of pork, be sure to cook it thoroughly to kill any harmful bacteria. Use a meat thermometer to ensure that the internal temperature reaches at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Pork should be cooked until it is slightly pink in the center, as this indicates that it has been cooked through. Do not allow the pork to cook so long that it becomes dry or tough.

Healthier Option:

Pork shoulder is a less healthy option than pork butt. Pork butt has significantly less fat than pork shoulder. For example, a 3-ounce serving of pork butt has 2 grams of fat, while a pork shoulder has 8 grams of fat. Pork butt also has more protein than pork shoulder. A 3-ounce serving of pork butt contains 24 grams of protein, while a pork shoulder contains 17 grams of protein. Additionally, pork butt is lower in calories than pork shoulder. A 3-ounce serving of pork butt contains 220 calories, while a pork shoulder contains 270 calories. Finally, pork butt is more marbled with meat and has a more intense flavor than pork shoulder. This makes it a healthier and more flavorful option.

Fat content:

Pork butt is typically used for pulled pork, whereas pork shoulder contains more connective tissue which provides a tougher chew. This means that the fat content in each piece of meat is generally different. Pork Butt has less fat, but it does have some marbling within the meat itself. It can be used as either a whole roast or cut up into steaks. Pork shoulder, on the other hand, has a higher fat content and more connective tissue resulting in a much lower price tag per pound. A 3-lb section of pork butt will cost around $13-$18, while 3 lbs of pork shoulder go for between $5-$8! 

Where do pork butt and pork shoulder from?

Pork butt is actually cut from the shoulder of the pig. The “butt” in pork butt comes from the fact that, years ago, it was preserved by placing it in barrels (the butts) with salt water or brine.  Pork shoulder is removed from the front leg and contains a large amount of connective tissue running through it which makes it an ideal candidate for cooking methods that require long periods of time at low temperatures with moist heat.

The Boston Butt 

This cut is taken from the upper portion of the front shoulder of a hog next to where its armpit would be. This piece has more marbling than other cuts so if you are doing long slow cooking this might be what you are looking for. 

The Pork Shoulder 

This cut is taken from the lower portion of the front shoulder and contains a lot of connective tissue. This is great for a barbecue because it will break down over time and make the meat very tender. You can also braise this cut or do a low and slow roast.

When buying pork butt or pork shoulder, look for cuts that have a good amount of marbling as they will be more flavorful. Ask your butcher to trim away any large amounts of fat before packaging, but be sure to leave some marbling intact. These cuts are best cooked using low and slow methods such as barbecuing, braising, or roasting.

When to use pork butt?

Some would say that pork butt is best used for pulled pork, while others might argue that it’s great for making bacon. Truthfully, pork butt can be used for a variety of different things – it just depends on what you’re looking for.

If you want to make pulled pork, then pork butt is definitely the way to go. It has a lot of marbling, which means that it will be juicy and flavorful when cooked. Plus, because it’s a tougher cut of meat, it will withstand long cooking times without becoming dry.

If you’re looking for something a little bit different, you could also try using pork butt to make bacon. It might sound strange, but it’s very common. And when smoked, the end result is reminiscent of traditional bacon in both appearance and taste. Plus, because pork butt is so much cheaper than other types of bacon, you can make a lot more for less money!

So if you’re looking to save some money, want to try something new, or are making pulled pork, give a pork butt a shot! You won’t be disappointed with this versatile cut of meat.

When to use pork shoulder?

Pork shoulder can be used in a variety of dishes, such as pulled pork, tacos, and carnitas. It is a tough cut of meat, so it needs to be cooked slowly over low heat to break down the connective tissue. This results in a tender and juicy dish. Pork shoulder is also a relatively economical cut of meat. So, if you are looking for an affordable protein option, pork shoulder is a good choice.

If you are planning to cook pork shoulder, there are a few things you need to know. First, make sure to trim off any excess fat before cooking. 

Second, pork shoulder can be cooked in a number of ways, such as in the oven, on the grill, or in a slow cooker. 

Third, if you plan on cooking the pork shoulder in the oven or on the stovetop, keep in mind that it needs to cook for a relatively long time. Slow and low heat is key when cooking this cut of meat. 

Finally, let your pork sit before cutting into it (unless you want dry and stringy meat). The reason for this is that once cooked, the muscle fibers tighten and hold most of their juices inside. Letting your pork rest will allow all of those juices to redistribute evenly throughout the meat before you slice it up.

Pork Shoulder Nutritional Value

Pork shoulder is a good source of protein and vitamin B6. It is also a very good source of selenium, zinc, and niacin. A 3-ounce serving of pork shoulder provides 93 calories, 5 grams of protein, and 1 gram of fat.

Nutrient Content per 100g % Daily Value Pork Shoulder: 

  • Calories 425 41% 
  • Protein (g) 36.7 37% 
  • Total Fat (g) 22.4 31% 
  • Vitamin B6 (mg) 1.1 18% 
  • Niacin (mg) 15.9 15% 
  • Zinc (mg) 5.2 20% 
  • Selenium (mcg) 52.3 54%
  • Fatty Acid Content per 100g 
  • Saturated Fat (g) 10.2 
  • Monounsaturated Fat (g) 7.5 
  • Polyunsaturated Fat (g) 1.4 
  • Omega-3 fatty acids (g) 0.5 
  • Omega-6 fatty acids (g) 1.0

Pork Butt Nutritional Value

Pork butt is tough, fatty meat that is best cooked slowly at a low temperature. Pork butt is high in fat and cholesterol, but it is also high in protein and B vitamins.

Nutritional values in 100g of Pork Butt are:

  • Calories: 234
  • Fat: 17.1g
  • Saturated fat: 5.5g
  • Cholesterol: 73mg
  • Sodium: 366mg
  • Carbohydrates: 0g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Sugar: 0g 
  • Protein: 19.8g
  • Fatty Acid Content per 100g 
  • Unsaturated:
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids: 2.7g 
  • Omega 6: 0.9g 
  • Omega 3: 1.9g
  • Monounsaturated fatty acids = 14.2g 
  • Oleic acid: 11.4g 
  • Palmitoleic acid: 1.3g 
  • Erucic acid: 1.1g
  • Saturated:
  • Saturated fatty acids = 10.5g 
  • Palmitic acid: 6.9g 
  • Stearic acid: 2.7g
  • Arachidic acid: 0.8g
  • Cholesterol = 128 mg (43%)
  • Minerals: 
  • Potassium = 441 mg (9%) 
  • Phosphorus = 547 mg (47%) 
  • Sodium = 196 mg (18%)
  • Vitamins: 
  • Vitamin B12 = 0.8 mcg (13%)
  • Choline = 1235 mg 
  • Betaine = 66 mg 
  • Folate = 11 mcg 
  • Niacin equivalent(NE) = 33 mg (42%)
  • Vitamin C 0.0 mg 
  • Pantothenic acid equivalent(PAE) = 3.9 mg 
  • Vitamin B6 = 0.9 mg 
  • Vitamin B2 = 0.1 mg

So, which should you choose? 

It really depends on the situation. If you’re cooking for a large crowd and want to spend as little time in the kitchen as possible, pork butt is the way to go. And if you’ve got some extra cash (or tend to save your pennies), opt for a larger pork butt so it can feed more people! But if you have a good amount of time on your hands, or have a smaller crowd coming over for dinner, choose a pork shoulder roast. The beauty of these two cuts is that they are both relatively inexpensive and versatile—they can be used in many different recipes from breakfast hash to French Dip sandwiches.

Which one is better?

That’s a tough question to answer, as both pork butt and pork shoulder have advantages depending on the situation. For example, pork butt is typically more tender than pork shoulder because it has more marbling. On the other hand, pork shoulder also contains a bone that can be used to make stock or soup, while the same isn’t true of pork butt.

Some Pork Butt Recipes:

1. Texas-Style Barbecue Pork Butt Recipe: 

This recipe is for those who want a smoky, spicy pork butt.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (6 to 8 pound) pork butt
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons yellow mustard
  • Tabasco sauce, to taste

Method:

  1. preheat oven to 275 degrees F.
  2. Mix together paprika, chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and black pepper. Rub all over the pork butt.
  3. Place pork in a large roasting pan or baking dish and roast for 6 to 8 hours, or until very tender.
  4. In a small bowl, mix together apple cider vinegar, ketchup, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, and yellow mustard.
  5. When pork is done cooking, remove it from the oven and let cool slightly. Shred meat with two forks and mix with the vinegar mixture. Season with Tabasco sauce to taste. Serve on hamburger buns or rolls.

2. Carolina-Style Barbecue Pork Butt Recipe: 

This recipe is for those who want a slightly sweet and tangy pork butt.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (6 to 8 pound) pork butt
  • 1/4 cup yellow mustard
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup ketchup
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Method: 

  1. Preheat oven to 275 degrees F (135 degrees C).
  2. In a small bowl, combine yellow mustard, apple cider vinegar, ketchup, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, salt, and black pepper.
  3. Place pork butt in a large roasting pan. Spread the mustard mixture over the top of the pork.
  4. Bake in the preheated oven for 6 hours, or until the pork is very tender.
  5. Remove from oven and let cool for 10 minutes before slicing.
  6. Serve with barbecue sauce if desired.

3. Memphis-Style Barbecue Pork Butt Recipe: 

This recipe is for those who want a pork butt that is both sweet and smoky.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (6 to 8 pound) pork butt
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar, packed
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce-1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 (12 ounce) can or bottle dark beer (regular, not light)
  • 2 tablespoons yellow mustard 

Method:

1) Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.

2) Combine all ingredients, except pork butt and beer, in a large saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally.

3) Remove from heat and pour mixture over pork butt in roasting pan. Add beer.

4) Roast for 6 hours or until the pork is very tender.

5) Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes before slicing. 

4. Santa Maria-style Barbecue Pork Butt Recipe: 

This recipe is for those who want a pork butt that is traditional old-school California BBQ, characterized by being seasoned with only salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and fresh parsley or thyme leaves if you have them available. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 (6 to 8 pound) pork butt 
  • 3 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt 
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic powder 
  • 1 teaspoon crumbled dried parsley or thyme leaves 

Method: 

  1. Preparation: If there is a thick layer of surface fat on the pork, make sure to remove it; if not, proceed straight to the next step. 
  2. Mix all dry ingredients together and rub into both sides of the meat using your hands until thoroughly combined and no more loose spices remain (some recipes also call for French thyme or rosemary leaves but I prefer parsley because I think it goes better with pork). Allow standing at room temperature for an hour before cooking so the salt can dissolve and be absorbed by the meat. 
  3. Set up a charcoal grill in two zones for indirect cooking, add about 4-5 pieces of wood chunks or chips you prefer when smoking over indirect heat (for gas grills, just preheat on one side and cook with the lid closed).
  4. Place pork on the cooler side of the grill, cover, and cook until very tender, about 8 hours (for larger roasts closer to 10 hours), turning every 2-3 hours, and adding more fuel as needed. The meat is done when it falls apart easily when pulled with a fork; if in doubt, give it another hour or two.
  5. Remove from grill and let rest for 15-20 minutes before carving into individual servings (I like to carve against the grain for maximum tenderness). 

Serve with your favorite BBQ sauce on the side—or not, if you prefer to sauce it yourself. 

Enjoy!

5. Korean-Style Barbecue Pork Butt Recipe: 

This recipe is for those who want a pork butt that is fiery red, sweet, spicy, garlicky, sesame scented, and slightly sticky. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1 (6 to 8 pound) pork butt 
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder 
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar 
  • 2 tablespoons gochujang (Korean chili paste) or sambal oelek (Indonesian chili sauce) 
  • 1 tablespoon ginger powder 
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder 
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil 
  • 2 tablespoons dark sesame seeds, divided use 
  • Salt and pepper 

Method: 

  1. Combine the garlic powder, sugar, gochujang, ginger powder, onion powder, and toasted sesame oil in a small bowl. 
  2. Cut the pork butt into 8 equal pieces. Season the pork with salt and pepper. Sprinkle the gochujang mixture over the pork and rub it in well. Thread the pork onto skewers (if using wooden skewers, soak in water for 30 minutes before using), making sure not to pack the meat too tightly. 
  3. Grill the skewers over medium-high heat, turning occasionally, until the pork is browned and cooked through, about 20 minutes. Remove from the grill and sprinkle with the dark sesame seeds. Serve immediately.

This recipe is perfect for summertime cookouts! The smoky flavor of the grilled pork pairs wonderfully with the sweet and spicy sauce. Give it a try! 

Some Pork Shoulder Recipes:

If you’re looking for some delicious pork shoulder recipes, here are a few that you might enjoy:

1. Pork Shoulder Roast with Gravy

This is a classic pork shoulder recipe that is sure to please. It’s simple to make and it’s delicious.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pork shoulder roast
  • 1 can of beef broth
  • 1 cup of dry white wine
  • 2 tablespoons of Dijon mustard
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 teaspoon of dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon of salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons of all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup of milk

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. 
  2. Place the pork shoulder roast in a large roasting pan. In a small bowl, whisk together the beef broth, white wine, Dijon mustard, garlic, thyme, salt, and pepper. Pour this mixture over the pork shoulder roast. Drizzle the pork shoulder roast with olive oil.
  3. Cover the pan tightly with heavy-duty aluminum foil, place in oven and cook for 3 hours or until the meat is tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and discard the foil. 
  4. Transfer pork shoulder roast to a cutting board; cover loosely with foil. Let it cool for 20 minutes before slicing into 1/4-inch thick slices; set aside. Pour juices from the pan into a measuring cup; skim off fat. Return juices to roasting pan (you will need 4 cups of liquid total). 
  5. Place pan on the stovetop over medium heat; add flour, stirring constantly until well combined, about 2 minutes. Add milk, stirring constantly until mixture has thickened, 6 to 8 minutes. 
  6. Serve gravy over pork shoulder slices.

2. Carolina BBQ Pork Shoulder

If you’re a fan of barbecue, you’ll love this recipe. It’s got a smoky flavor that is sure to please.

Ingredients:  

  • 3  tbsp  Liquid Smoke (I used hickory) 
  • 1/2 cup apple juice 
  • 2 tsp salt 
  • 2 tsp cumin 
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced 
  • 1 tsp chili powder 
  • 1 tbsp ground mustard 
  • 4.5 lbs bone-in pork shoulder or Boston butt

Instructions: 

  1. Make the marinade by whisking together the liquid smoke, apple juice, salt, cumin, garlic, and chili powder. 
  2. Place your pork in a large ziplock bag and cover it with the marinade. Allow to chill in the refrigerator for 8 hours or overnight. When you’re ready to cook, preheat your oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Pour out most of the marinade, reserving about 1/4 cup. 
  3. Place the pork shoulder in a large roasting pan and roast for 3-4 hours, or until it’s falling apart. Remove from the oven and allow to rest for 10 minutes before slicing. 
  4. Serve with the reserved marinade on the side.

This dish is perfect for a crowd, and it’s sure to be a hit at your next barbecue! Enjoy!

3. Crockpot Honey Pork Shoulder

This is a great slow cooker recipe that is perfect for busy days. The pork shoulder is cooked until it’s tender and juicy.

Ingredients:

  • 1 boneless pork shoulder roast
  • 1 cup honey
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons dried leaf thyme
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions:

  1. Trim excess fat from roast and discard. Cut roast into 3 or 4 pieces; place in a large crockpot.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the honey, garlic, salt, thyme, and pepper; stir to blend well. Pour over roast and toss to coat completely. Cover crockpot and cook on LOW for 8-10 hours (see blog post for alternate instructions).
  3. During the last 30 minutes of cooking time, open the crockpot and turn heat to HIGH; remove the lid during the last 15 minutes of cooking time to allow the sauce to thicken slightly (if necessary). Serve pork with desired sauce from crockpot spooned over the meat.

4. Puerto Rican Style Pork Shoulder

If you’re looking for something a little different, this pork shoulder recipe is great. It’s got a bit of spice and it’s full of flavor.

Ingredients:

  • 1 Pork Shoulder, boneless
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 green pepper, sliced thin
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil or olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped fine
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano leaves
  • 3 bay leaves

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).
  2. In a large roasting pan, combine garlic, green pepper, oil, onion, oregano, and bay leaves. Add the pork shoulder and coat with the vegetables and spices.
  3. Bake for 2 1/2 to 3 hours in the preheated oven, or until the pork is very tender. Remove from oven and let rest for 10 minutes before slicing.
  4. Serve sliced pork shoulder warm with some of the pan juices poured over it.

This dish is perfect for a Sunday supper with your family – it’s hearty and flavorful! The pork shoulder is cooked slowly in the oven it’s really tender and juicy. And it’s topped with a delicious mix of veggies. 

5. Dr. Pepper Pork Shoulder

If you like drinks, you’ll love this recipe. It takes your pork shoulder and marinates it in Dr. Pepper before cooking.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pork shoulder
  • 1 bottle of Dr. Pepper
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper

Instructions:

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a large resealable bag. 
  2. Marinate the pork shoulder in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours or up to 24 hours. 
  3. Preheat your grill to medium-high heat. 
  4. Grill the pork shoulder for 8-10 minutes per side, or until it’s cooked through. 
  5. Remove from the grill and let rest for 10 minutes before serving with your favorite side dish.

6. Bourbon Barbecue Pork Shoulder

This sauce gives the pork a nice flavor that everyone will enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • 1 pork shoulder (3-4 lbs)
  • 1 cup bourbon
  • 1/2 cup ketchup
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder

Instructions:

  1. In a small saucepan, heat the bourbon over medium heat until it begins to simmer. Cook for 2-3 minutes, or until reduced by half. 
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the ketchup, apple cider vinegar, brown sugar, Worcestershire sauce, smoked paprika, garlic powder, and onion powder. Add the bourbon and whisk until well combined.
  3. Place the pork shoulder in a large dutch oven or pot, pour the sauce over it, cover, and cook for 4 hours on low, or until tender. 
  4. Remove the pork from the pot and place it on a baking sheet covered with foil; brush about half of the barbecue sauce all over the top of the meat. Turn on your broiler to medium-low heat and put the oven rack about 5 inches away from the broiler element. Broil for 8-10 minutes, brushing with more sauce every couple of minutes, until browned and crispy on top. 
  5. Let rest at least 10 minutes before serving with remaining barbecue sauce if desired! Enjoy! 

7. Balsamic Honey Pork

This easy recipe only has 4 ingredients so if you’re looking for something simple, this might be just what you need!

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound pork tenderloin
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together honey, balsamic vinegar, and olive oil.
  3. Place pork tenderloin in a baking dish and pour honey mixture over top.
  4. Bake for 25 minutes or until pork is cooked through.
  5. Serve immediately.

8. Peking Pork Roast

Give your pork shoulder a bit of an Asian twist with this recipe. It’s full of flavor and it’s sure to please.

Ingredients:

  • 1 pork shoulder
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 clove garlic, minced

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together soy sauce, honey, rice vinegar, ground ginger, and garlic.
  3. Place pork shoulder in a roasting pan and pour the sauce over top.
  4. Roast for 3 hours, or until the pork is cooked through and falling apart.
  5. Serve with rice or noodles and enjoy!

9. Grilled Pork Shoulder: 

If you’re looking for a grilled pork shoulder recipe that is sure to impress, look no further! This recipe is sure to please everyone at your next barbecue.

Ingredients:

  • Boneless pork shoulder, approximately 8 pounds
  • Kosher salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 cup white wine vinegar
  • 1/3 cup fresh lime juice
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced

Instructions:

  1. Preheat grill to medium-high heat.
  2. Season the pork shoulder with salt and pepper.
  3. In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat.
  4. Add the pork shoulder and cook for 3-4 minutes per side, or until evenly browned.
  5. Remove from heat and let cool slightly.
  6. In a small bowl, whisk together white wine vinegar, lime juice, and garlic.
  7. Pour the vinegar mixture over the pork shoulder and let marinate for at least 1 hour, up to 12 hours.
  8. Grill the pork shoulder for 6-8 minutes per side, or until cooked through
  9. Let rest for 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

As you can see, there are lots of different recipes that you can try with pork shoulder. No matter what your taste preferences are, you’re sure to find something that you’ll love. So, get out your slow cooker or grill and get cooking! You won’t regret it.

 

FAQs

How Do you Cook a Pork Shoulder?

Pork shoulder can be cooked in a number of ways, but the most popular is to roast it. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Rub the pork shoulder with olive oil, then season it with salt, pepper, and your favorite herbs. Place the pork shoulder in a roasting pan, and cook it for about 3 hours, or until it’s cooked through.

Can I Freeze a Pork Shoulder?

Yes, you can freeze a pork shoulder. Wrap the pork shoulder tightly in plastic wrap, then place it in a freezer bag. Freeze the pork shoulder for up to 3 months.

What Temperature Should I Cook Pork Shoulder and Pork Butt? 

Pork shoulder should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit. Pork butt should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

How Long Does it Take to Cook a Pork Shoulder?

It takes about 8 hours for pork shoulder, and around 12 hours for pork butt, to cook through in a slow cooker. This results in meat that is extremely tender and falls apart easily.

Does Pork Shoulder Contain Gluten?

Yes, pork shoulder typically contains gluten because it’s made using wheat flour as a binder. Some cuts of pork don’t contain any gluten, though, so you can ask your butcher for more information on how your particular cut was processed. If you feeling ambitious (and want to do some of your own butcherings), you can remove the wheat flour from the pork shoulder yourself by rinsing away any excess after cooking.

Can I Make Pork Shoulder in a Pressure Cooker?

Yes, you can cook pork shoulder in a pressure cooker. Just brown and sear it first and add liquid to the pressure cooker so that it will come up to high pressure, then cover and cook the meat for about 45 minutes. You’ll know it’s done when its internal temperature reaches 195 degrees Fahrenheit.

 

Conclusion

The differences between pork butt and pork shoulder reflect the different tastes of consumers when it comes to meat. Some prefer chewy, more firm textures, while others enjoy more tender cuts of meat with strong flavors. Both types of meat have their own unique properties that make them popular choices in various dishes. With so much demand for both products it’s no surprise that they’re easy to find at most butchers or specialty markets; however, if you do see what you want ask your local butcher if they can order it for you.

Pork butt and pork shoulder are both great choices when it comes to cooking meat. Pork butt is more expensive but has a lot of flavors and is very juicy. Pork shoulder is less expensive and has a milder flavor, but it can be tough if not cooked properly. Both cuts of meat are available at most butcher shops or specialty markets. Try out both cuts of meat and see which one you prefer!

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